FAQ

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Q: What's the big rush about getting braces as soon as possible?
Q: What is it like to get braces?
Q: But won't someone stand out like a sore thumb if they get braces?
Q: How much does it hurt to get braces?
Q: Do braces change the taste of the food someone eats?
Q: What happens to a patient on his first visit to your office?
Q: How do you help patients and families feel at ease with these changes?


Q: What's the big rush about getting braces as soon as possible?

A: The early treatment of orthodontic problems is easier physically as well as socially. In youth, bones are still changeable. While teeth are still moving, we can better guide them. Also, it is easier to wear braces while other children have them on as well.

Q: What is it like to get braces?

A: Getting braces is a positive experience. In some areas of medicine, people go because they have to go. Eighty percent of the people who go to an orthodontist go because they want to go. We make a difference in people's lives that they can see right in the mirror with the gaps in their teeth being closed. We also make our office fun by having video games in the waiting room and playing contemporary music.

Q: But won't someone stand out like a sore thumb if they get braces?

A: With the comfortable appliances and fun, trendy colors of braces, kids are comparing their braces and enjoying having them. Approximately 25% of middle schoolers have braces. Younger siblings are looking at older siblings and wishing they had braces.

Q: How much does it hurt to get braces?

A: There's no pain whatsoever in the application of braces. After the braces are applied, there will be some mild discomfort for a couple of days as the teeth begin to move. That goes away quickly.

Q: Do braces change the taste of the food someone eats?

A: It doesn't change the taste, but it does change the texture. People with braces can't eat hard or chewy foods, because they might pull the braces off. When your friends eat candy, you can eat a cupcake. When they eat popcorn, you can eat potato chips. Enjoy pizza, just skip the crust.

Q: What happens to a patient on his first visit to your office?

A: First, we examine the person to make sure they have an orthodontic problem. If the problem exists, we make study models, X-rays, photographs and things like that, to tailor our treatment plan to that person. Later we have a patient orientation session, where we teach tooth brushing, diet and how to care for the braces. At the next visit we put the braces on.

Q: How do you help patients and families feel at ease with these changes?

A: We feel our family orientation is one of the strengths of our practice. We hire people who have children of their own, so we understand the difficulties of childhood and adolescence. We are able to answer any questions and ease any concerns you may have about your journey through orthodontic treatment.